Forum Posts

mmorgan317
Nov 11, 2021
In Arthurian Legends & Romance
The Fair Elaine's unrequited love of Lancelot bothered me a lot. She tells him she's in love with him, asks him to marry her, then when he refuses and tries to buy her off with a very handsome sum and she refuses, saying she'll only ever love him or die, what does he do? He says, "Well, I've done all I could. It's not my fault you love me. Die if you wish, I can't do anything more for you." Then when her father goes to Lancelot and talks about his daughter is prepared to die for her love of Lancelot, Lancelot's response is, "Look it's not my fault she loves me. I haven't encouraged her, this is all her own doing. It sucks for her." And not only is the father okay with this, but so are her brothers?! What is wrong with these people??! And as to Lancelot's not encouraging her, isn't him taking a favour from her during the tourney kind of encouraging her? I mean, it's very possible that I've taken the wrong message from the Arthurian culture to which I've been subjected throughout my life, but I always assumed that accepting the favour was akin to saying, "I'm interested enough to carry this into (fake) battle", or, "I'm fighting this fight for you", which, in my mind, is encouragement. So, no, Lancelot is not blameless in her death, and it is absolutely wrong for everyone to be okay with her giving up on life for love of Lancelot. And it felt to me very anti-chivalrous of Lancelot and Lavain to wash their hands of the matter, claim no fault and no care, and leave. I know Lancelot can do no wrong in many a person's eyes so it didn't surprise me when no one brought this up in class, but I had to get it off my chest. Megan M.
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mmorgan317
Nov 04, 2021
In Arthurian Legends & Romance
Mallory appears to me to be an encyclopedia written in a biblical style. Much of the first half is: "this guy did this and said this in this time, and so shall it be." It makes it very hard to trudge your way through the book, which then means that you get behind on the reading, and before long you begin to wonder if you'll ever catch up. I suppose that's what the weekend is for, yes? Also, for being named Le Morte Darthur, Arthur has very little role in the book itself. He's present in the beginning, and he's not represented very well by Mallory (as has been mentioned in class, he's clearly drawing from the French version of Arthur), but after page 95, he's not really mentioned much at all. We are given Lancelot's story, and Gareth's story, which is fine, and I'm sure we'll head back to Arthur at the end, just in time to see him die, but I do feel like the title is misleading. Maybe it's just me, but I think Arthur needs a better story. So far, in what we've read, Arthur is a dolt, a terrible husband, not a great king, or he's a conquerer and not much else. I look forward to reading a story where he's actually good at his job, good at being a husband (albeit without an heir), and a good man/knight. Arthur is one of my favorite characters, and to see him so badly represented irks me. I know many don't like him, and prefer Lancelot, or Tristan (Tristram?), or the like more so, but Arthur has always been my favorite - a fact for which I blame "The First Knight".
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mmorgan317
Oct 21, 2021
In Arthurian Legends & Romance
Although we're only reading certain portions from the Vulgate Cycle, it's obvious it's necessary because, between the several different writers, it fills in a lot of missing details/history. When reading Lancelot, the reader begins to appreciate the full view of how he was raised, how he came to be at Arthur's court, and, more importantly, how he came to be in love with Guinevere. The Vulgate's Lancelot takes Chrétien's Knight of the Cart and not only fills in the blanks but also expands the story so that Cart makes more sense to a certain degree. It allows the reader to get to know Lancelot, fall in love with him, and root for him and Guinevere. Due to the authors' dislike of Arthur, it softens the adultery aspect of the story because the reader no longer finds Arthur as charming or as interesting. Also, I'm slowly compiling a list of characters who need their own stories. Anna is chief among them; I feel like she deserves to be more than a sidenote in Arthur's story. Galehaut is another who I would love to read a novel on. His story is bittersweet, but it could be beautiful as well. I would also really like to read Galahad's story - how he grew up, what all he was told, etc. I think it would be an interesting insight into his character. Megan M.
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